To Share or Not to Share?

I ended up scrapping the idea I brainstormed Friday night.  Story wouldn’t stick.  No worries, though.  I came up with a new one last night.  Haven’t fleshed out the male lead in the story and have to watch my tendency to write a female who can kick his ass.  This is for a romance market after all. 😉

I dreamed I got the call from one of the agents looking at my urban fantasy.  Woke up… then cracked up.  Do you think it’s on my mind a bit? 

Speaking of agents, there have been some interesting conversations going on in the blogosphere lately about how much to share during the querying process.   Someone said talking about rejections on your blog can hurt you. 

I don’t totally agree.  Think it has more to do with HOW you share.  Badmouthing or even saying which agents are turning you down?  Big no no, IMO.  And coming off whiny, petulant or pissed?  Might as well stop querying now.

Saying you’ve sent out 15 queries and gotten a no from less than half?  Don’t think that hurts anything.  Not every project is right for every person.  Just because one agent feels he or she can’t get behind a story doesn’t mean another won’t absolutely love it. 

This is a business.  Even though it can feel personal because we invest so much of ourselves and our time into the manuscripts, it really isn’t.  Most of the nos I’ve received have been very complimentary. 

One even used words like talented and brilliant.  But the project wasn’t right for her and I fully understand that. (And oh yeah, it was nice to hear such adjectives.)

I may get a little impatient here and there, but not with any particular agent.  Mine stems from a desire to get going full steam on this.  As many writers will share, the waiting can be the hardest part. 

So, in the meantime, it’s best to focus on a project.  Or in my case, a few.  Think I’m going to actually start marketing some of the short fiction again.  The finished Valen Greer piece has only gone out to a couple of magazines and one considered it big time–even had me do rewrites.  Valen has too strong a personality to just sit back and be ignored.  I may even end up sharing the polished and very different version here.

orton.jpg

Today, I’m listening to Beth Orton.    I’ve got Daybreaker and Central Reservation on the Itunes playlist, but I’m eyeing this new EP. 

 mckay.jpg

Also mixed in a bit of Jonatha Brooke Live and Nelly McKay .  Nelly is one artist who is impossible to describe.  Jazzy?  Alternative?  To me, she’s fiercely intelligent, unflinchingly honest and smart-mouthed, so of course, I love her. 😉

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About Rinda Elliott

Writer.I love unusual stories and credit growing up in a family of curious life-lovers who moved all over the country. Books and movies full of fantasy, science fiction and romance kept us amused, especially in some of the stranger places. For years, I tried to separate my darker side with my humorous and romantic one. I published short fiction, but things really started happening when I gave in and mixed it up. When not lost in fiction, I love making wine, collecting music, gaming and spending time with my husband and two children. I’m represented by Miriam Kriss of the Irene Goodman Agency.
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5 Responses to To Share or Not to Share?

  1. Oh, yes waiting is the hardest in the whole process! I totally feel the same way about it and it’s the waiting that makes you nuts. Everything else we can handle, now can’t we?

    Good luck on your projects! I’m waiting on magazines to reply on some of my short stories. Hope they like it!

  2. Laura says:

    Oh… I had almost forgotten about the Valen Greer story. That was some interesting stuff. I know I don’t have to remind you, but let us know if you place it somewhere. I’ll definitely be one to buy that issue!

    And I agree about blogging rejections. The fact is, that’s just part of the process, and it’s good to have voices out there modeling a professional way of handling that inevitability. When other aspiring writers come here (like myself, who actually just received a rejection on a short story), it might help them adopt a more mature perspective on their own climb toward publication. Editors and agents might actually appreciate that aspect…

    The main thing is that you keep working, and keep trying to push your writing to the next level of awesomeness. These things also come across on your blog.

  3. relliott4 says:

    This is exactly why I do share, Laura. Yes, they can be disappointing, but they are just a part of the process. Plus, they tend to make that “yes” all the sweeter. Sorry about yours this week. I got a very polite one myself. It was on the old beginning of DOTT, so I was expecting it. 🙂

  4. Missy says:

    Rinda, you always inspire me. You have a full life and yet you manage to write and keep plugging away in your quest to get published. It makes me think I can manage to do the same in spite of my debilitating migraines.

    On a side note, Nellie McKay does a version of P.S. I Love You on the movie’s soundtrack. I really like her voice and have been meaning to search out more of her music. Thanks to your recommendation I’ll stop procrastinating.

  5. relliott4 says:

    Yay! I might have got someone else stuck on McKay. She’s fantastic. Very, very different. I love how you’ll be listening to a track about Manhattan–it’s all jazzy and smooth– and she’ll say “scuzzy hue” right in the middle. Or she sing about someone chopping their head off to be a lighter person… brighter. LOL! She even does a great sort of rap in a song called Sari. She’s opinionated and unafraid to share. I bet she rocks live.

    I’m glad you find inspiration here. While the comments have slowed, I still see a lot of readers coming through here daily. I’m bad about this myself with Bloglines and working full time now. 😉 It’s good to know I have other writers pulling for me and maybe finding that inspiration they need to keep plugging away themselves. We’re gonna have a big ol blog party here when I do get that call. (g)

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